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Pass & Seymour RT1 Seven Button Digital Timer Review

June 30, 2010

Conserve energy and save money with P&S Timers. And get the quality, performance and functionality you’ve come to expect from P&S. Businesses and homeowners are going green and looking for ways to reduce energy consumption. Their timers are a simple, effective solution that makes saving energy easy. People forget, but their timers always remember! P&S Timers add convenience in other ways, too. They provide simple, intuitive operation. And illuminated models are available, making it easy to find a control in the dark.

The P&S Timer line offers all the choices you need to meet any residential or commercial requirement. That includes models with 20-Amp capacity — enough to operate many types of fans and pumps — plus mechanical and digital models that handle up to 600 Watts of lighting and multiple lighting types (incandescent, fluorescent and low-voltage). You can select models with time delays from 15 minutes up to 12 hours. Now’s the time to make energy savings automatic.

Introducing the RT1 7-button digital timer. It’s great for walk-in closets, kids’ rooms, basements, recreation areas, garages and pantries.

Pass & Seymour RT1 7-button digital timer controls
  • UL listed.
  • 5-year warranty.
  • Manual ON/OFF.
  • Seven-button preset time switch.
  • Adjustable time delay: 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60 minutes.
  • Lighted switch for visibility in darkened rooms.
  • Controls most types of lighting. Incandescent, fluorescent, compact
    fluorescent (CFL), magnetic low-voltage (MLV),
    electronic low-voltage (ELV) and up to 1/6 hp motors

Fast, easy installation with pre-stripped leads.

Pass & Seymour RT1 7-button digital timer wiring

Quality construction — ensures dependability and a long service life. Smooth, contemporary design — a great fit in any décor.

Dimensions:

Pass & Seymour RT1 7-button digital timer dimensions

Click here to get a FREE P&S screwless wall plate

 

Finding Bolts for Your Electric Dryer Power Cord, Wiring a 3-Prong Dryer Receptacle and Wiring GFCI Receptacles

June 29, 2010

DIY Electrical Wiring Help Angila Adams asks:
I have a really big problem; I have a Signature 2000 Dryer by Norge! I was going to change the power cord to a four prong but, can’t cause I lost the bolts for the wires! I’ve bought all different size bolts and can’t find the right size and just wondering if you can help me with that. I would be very thankful cause I got some clothes I would like to dry at home instead of a dang laundry mat lol.

Answer:
You have a few options here. I’m guessing that you dropped the bolts down inside of the dryer. So, you could take apart the dryer and retrieve the bolts. This is very easy to do. First, unplug your dryer. The top of the dryer lifts up and is typically hinged on the backside. A flat blade screwdriver works well to lift the top up. Now you will need to remove the front panel with the door. This is usually held in place with 2 sheet metal screws. The screws are on each side, near the top of the panel and on the inside. After you remove the front panel, you need to remove the drum. This typically pulls forward; be careful not to break the belt wrapped around the drum. The screws should be on the bottom. If there is lint or dust in the bottom of your dryer, then this is a great time to clean the inside of your dryer.

Another option is to look in your local yellow pages book for “Appliance Service and Repair”. Hopefully, someone local has the bolts in stock. If not, then there is always the internet. I recommend Appliance Parts Pros. I live in a rural area and our local appliance parts stores never seem to have the part which I’m looking for. I’ve used Appliance Parts Pros several times and they have always provided a great service.

 

Ed asks:
What about hooking up a 4 wire supply cord from the electric box to a 3 prong (old style) receptacle? The black and red (hot) wires and the white wire (neutral) all go into the receptacle. But what about the bare copper wire? It’s obviously a ground wire, so can I just attach it to the metal case of the receptacle?

Answer:
Yes. You are required to bond all metallic parts. This includes the metal case of the receptacle.

 

Kenny asks:
I have a 20 AMP breaker with 12-2 wire for my first floor kitchen where there are 2 wires attached to it. One wire goes to an outlet on the kitchen counter that I have a GFCI on by itself. The other wire goes to 2 outlets in the same double box. I have installed 2 GFCI outlets in the box wired correctly I believe. The wire coming from the breaker is on the line side of the first GFCI and the second GFCI with a jumper going from the line to the Load side of the first GFCI. Will this cause a problem? They seem to work fine as I have plugged lights into both in the double box and they stay lit and do not blow the GFCI. Will the single GFCI in the box by itself protect the other outlets in the double box due to them being attached at the Breaker? I do not mind it being overkill if that is all it is, due to it being an rental apartment.

Answer:
The first GFCI will NOT protect the others through the circuit breaker.

You do not need the second GFCI in the double gang box. You can use a regular duplex receptacle here as it will be protected by the GFCI. If you elect to keep the second GFCI in the double gang box, then you may change the terminations on the first GFCI to the line side instead of the load side.

 

Fluke Recalls Noncontact Electrical Tester Due to Shock or Burn Hazard

June 28, 2010

Fluke-1AC-I VoltAlert Voltage Tester On March 11, 2010 Fluke Corporation, of Everett, WA recalled approximately 33,000 VoltAlert® voltage detectors. The testers can fail to give an indication of live voltage, resulting in the operator falsely believing the electrical power is off, posing a risk of serious injury or death from electrical shock or thermal burns. No injuries have been reported.

The Fluke voltage testers look like a pen with a yellow, white and gray body. The testers measure 90 to 1000 volts alternating current (VAC). “Fluke” and the model number are printed on the front of each unit. The recall involves Fluke 1AC-A1-I VoltAlert® tester.

These units were sold at industrial distributors and electrical wholesalers nationwide from September 2009 through February 2010 for about $25 and manufactured in China.

You should stop using the recalled product immediately and contact Fluke for a free replacement. For additional information, contact Fluke toll-free at (888) 983-5853 between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or visit their website at www.fluke.com/1AC-A1recall.

Saturday Morning Round Up for Week Ending 6-26

June 26, 2010

Saturday Morning Round UP for week ending 6-5 In this week’s roundup I found some free software, an article on outdoor DIY projects and a couple of cool giveaways.

Unplggd had an article about Dwell Design Desk: Free Online 3D Home Design Tool. Autodesk® Homestyler™ is free online home design software which brings your interior design plans and remodeling dreams to life. Easy drag and drop, brand name products, and 3D views make using Autodesk Homestyler the best way to start your next home design project. This looks like a very cool online tool.

 

Re-nest had a pretty cool roundup from June 14 20 Outdoor DIY Projects To Take Pride In. I really liked the article about how to make LED lights for party decoration. We have a row of trees on the other side of our back deck. These would be cool for one of our parties this summer.

Home Construction & Improvement is giving away a FloorMaster 250BN – Hardwood Flooring Finish Nailer with 2 boxes of 2 inch nails. This finish nailer features a proprietary 45º detachable no-mar nailing guide, and no-mar pads, that protect the floor, wall and cabinets from marring, scratching or denting. A proprietary depth-of-drive design, which helps to eliminate tongue splitting. A proprietary nail lock-out design that eliminates blank firing. Go enter the Duo-Fast FloorMaster 250BN Giveaway today.

One Project Closer is having another giveaway. I won a SKIL saw from one of their previous giveaways. These guys have a lot of cool giveaways. This time their giving away a brand new Black & Decker 24v String Trimmer / Edger (NST 1024) shipped right to your door- a value of $149.97! Go enter their B&D Cordless Trimmer Giveaway now.

How to Rewire a Floor Lamp

June 25, 2010

Today I’m going to provide step-by-step instructions with pictures on how to rewire a floor lamp. The lamp cord was damaged and needed to be replaced. In my opinion, this is the best method for repairing a bad or damaged lamp cord. Another alternative would be to use butt splices and heat shrink tubing. However, this looks tacky and very unprofessional.

Before we get started, be sure the lamp is unplugged, remove the lamp shade and light bulb.

As you can see in the image, the lamp cord was damaged. My step son’s puppy chewed the cord. So it needs to be replaced.
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You are going to need some lamp cord and a plug for materials to complete this task. These items cost me a little under $6.00 at Lowes.
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Step 1. Remove the lamp harp.
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Step 2. Remove the outer part of the lamp socket.
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Step 3. Now grab the inner part of the lamp socket and gently pull it out exposing 6 to 8 inches of the lamp cord.
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Step 4. This is what your lamp should look like at this point.
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Step 5. Now tip the socket upside down; turning the wires up.
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Step 6. Slip the wires out of the supports.
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Step 7. Now you need something small to remove the wires. A large paper clip works well here.
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Step 8. If you look in the hole with the wire, you will notice a piece of spring steel at an approximate 45 degree angle pinching the wire. Simply push down on the spring steel while pulling the wire out.
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Step 9. Repeat the process for the other wire.
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Step 10. Now remove the clear bushing.
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Step 11. Now go to the bottom of the lamp and cut the lamp cord to approximately 6 inches long.
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Step 12. Remove the clear bushing at the bottom of the lamp.
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Step 13. Use your diagonal pliers to cut down the center of the wires approximately 1/2 of an inch deep.
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Step 14. Spread the 2 wires apart approximately 4 inches long.
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Step 15. Strip approximately 2 1/2 inches of insulation off of the wires.
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Step 16. Twist the strands of wire together; counterclockwise.
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Step 17. Create a “U” shape with the bare wire. Bend the bare wire approximately 1/2 of an inch away from the insulation. Hook the 2 wires together and wrap the 1 inch tails back on each wire so that it looks like the picture.
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Step 18. Use electrical tape to tape up the splice.
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Step 19. Now use the existing lamp cord to pull in your new lamp cord. Pull from the lamp socket. You want pull approximately 6 to 8 inches beyond the lamp socket.
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Step 20. Cut the lamp cord to approximately 4 inches long.
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Step 21. Use your diagonal pliers to cut down the center of the wires approximately 1/2 of an inch deep.
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Step 22. Peel the wires apart approximately 2 inches long. Then strip off approximately 3/4 of an inch of insulation and twist the wire strands together counterclockwise.
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Step 23. Reinstall the clear bushing.
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Step 24. Connect the neutral wire to the neutral terminal on the lamp socket. The neutral terminal on the lamp socket is marked. The neutral wire in the lamp cord is identified by either writing on the wire or ribs on the wire.
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Step 25. Repeat the process for the hot wire.
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Step 26. Slip the wires under the supports.
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Step 27. Pull the lamp cord from the bottom of the lamp until the inner part of the lamp socket is flush with the bottom of the lamp socket.
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Step 28. Snap the outer part of the lamp socket into place
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Step 29. Reinstall the lamp harp.
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Step 30. Reinstall the clear plastic bushing in the bottom of the lamp.
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Step 31. Pinch the two prongs together and pull to remove the center portion of the plug assembly.
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Step 32. You need the 2 pieces separated so that you can connect the plug to the lamp cord.
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Step 33. Insert the lamp cord through the brown outer portion of the plug and into the center portion of the plug. You need to pay close attention to the direction that the lamp cord is placed into the plug. The wider prong is the neutral. The wire needs to be placed into the plug to allow the neutral prong to connect with the neutral wire.
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Step 34. Pull the wire back through the brown outer portion allowing the center portion to properly seat and connect to the lamp cord.
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Finally, install the light bulb (I recommend CFL or LED), lamp shade, plug in, turn on and test.

 

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