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Answers to Electrical Questions about Splicing 220 Volt Circuits, Water Heater Breaker and Electrical Consulting

September 9, 2007

Mark Nagel Says:
I need to move my air conditioning condenser/compressor to fit a shed behind my garage. The electical shut off also needs to be moved about 5 feet. The wire from the Breaker box to the shut off is too short to move 5?. Can I add an electrical/junction box and splice 8? more length with wire nuts to move the air conditioner shutoff box? I’ve done this before for lights and outlets, but not a high load 220 line. Does this need to be continuous from the breaker box or can I splice in and extend it? Also anything special beside wire nuts?

Thanks
Mark

A: Yes, it is fine to splice your 240 volt circuit in a junction box. Wire nuts will work fine. Make sure you use the correct size wire nuts for your wire. The junction box needs to be covered as well. 

 

Lori Meehan Says:
Is it possible that my computor could be causing my hot water heaters breaker to flip off?

A: LOL, I would like to say no, but I’ve learned that anything is possible. I’m assuming that your water heater is 240 volts and your computer is 120 volts. These should be on 2 separate circuits. If your water heater circuit breaker keeps tripping, I recommend checking the heating elements.

 

T Says:
My inlaws are moving out of thier house and are passing it on my family. My wife and I would like to upgrade the electricity from just a 120 in order to be albe to use modern dohikies. your help would be grreatly appreciated.
Thank u

A: I provide electrical consulting on my ezDIYelectricity website. I can easily provide you with a materials list, wiring diagrams and answer any residential electrical wiring question you may have during the re-wire. 

DIY Electrical Wiring Help from a Master Electrician Do you need assistance with your electrical wiring project? Please visit my DIY Electrical Wiring Help from a Master Electrician page. Where I provide electrical wiring tips, expert electrical advice, answers to your electrical questions and electrical consulting & design services over the phone, via instant messenger or via email.

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Comments

9 Responses to “Answers to Electrical Questions about Splicing 220 Volt Circuits, Water Heater Breaker and Electrical Consulting”

  1. Sarah on October 4th, 2007 6:46 am

    My husband and I purchased a home a few years ago but most of the outlet covers (and some of the receptacles) and light switches were broken or painted on. As part of our renovation we decided to change out all of the outlets and covers and light switches to a newer modern design. In the home there are three outlets controlled by light switches. We changed the switches and the outlets still worked. However, when we changed the outlets the switches no longer control the receptacles; all the rest of the outlets work correctly. We made sure to change each wire one by one so they are in the same places on the new receptable and checked all of the wires – everything seems to be working correctly. Any idea what we might have done wrong? They are grounded outlets. The only difference is the style of the receptacle and cover. Thank you.

  2. Non electrical wizard on May 14th, 2008 6:45 pm

    I just removed a range that had an above attached microwave oven. I now have to purchase a separate range and microwave. I am wondering if there is any way of splitting off the power coming into the stove and reducing it to 110 circuit for the microwave which I am installing over the range.

  3. Dave Cake on October 21st, 2008 11:43 am

    I am on a gov’t reserve ship, trying to wire a dimmer onto a light on the bridge, We have a 220-volt electrical system on here with no neutral (both legs are hot). What kind of dimmer can i use to accomplish this? Thanks.

  4. bob on November 10th, 2008 1:23 pm

    I am replacing an electric stove with a seperate rangetop and wall oven. Can I just split the exsting 220 line to feed both, or do I need to run a seperate 220 line to each?

  5. lew harrison on November 21st, 2008 7:39 am

    Have a lof of wind here and am thinking of setting up a poll with a wind collector. Need information as to where to obtain a generator (220)to turn the effort into electrical current for house use. Wish just using to generate heat for the house.
    Thank you,

    Lew

  6. Aaron Crawford on November 21st, 2008 10:56 am

    I just built a new pole building on my farm and I need to ran some electric to it for lights and maybe some outlets. My father suggested that I splice into a 220 volt circuit I have running outside for a water pump. That would be fine with me , but I want to have 110 Volts out in my building. I told him that I would have to use a Voltage converter but Iam not really sure if I do or not. Could you please give me some idea on how I can splice into a 220 Volt circuit and get 110 Volts for my power supply without using a converter? Thanks …

  7. denise hale on May 9th, 2010 1:04 pm

    we got a bigger air conditioner it uses220 power our old one uses 110 power the question is will we need to change the wiring to hook it up?because the plug end is different from the old one it bigger and different

  8. Clif Williams on April 16th, 2011 7:24 am

    Are kitchen range cords available in longer than 6ft length – about 8ft? If not, how may I extend the range cord?

  9. Mike on November 25th, 2012 6:36 am

    My son recently built a detached garage. He has an old 220 line buried in the back yard from the previous owner that used it for a pool filter and is off at the breaker panel in the house. Can he use this as the power supply to the new garage? Just needs lights and 110 outlets in garage, no 220 line. Can he run this line to a small service panel in the garage and then convert to 110?

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