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Wiring 2 Receptacles, 1 Light Switch and a Light in a Shed

December 9, 2007

I have a cabin and I want to run some wire to my shed. In the shed I will have 2 receptacles and a light that is controlled by a switch. The question I have is where should the circuit start….at the switch, or the light or at a receptacle.

It doesn’t matter where you start the circuit. You may start it where ever it is easiest for you. If it were me, I would probably start the circuit at the light switch. From the switch install a cable over to the first receptacle. You also need to run switched power from the light switch up to the light. Finally, install a cable from the first receptacle over to the second receptacle.

Terminations in the switch box:
1. Connect all ground wires together and leave an approximate 6 inch tail to connect to the ground screw on the switch.
2. Connect all of the neutrals together, place a wire nut on them and fold them into the switch box.
3. Connect the 2 power wires together (power in and power out to the first receptacle) with an approximate 6 inch tail to connect to your switch. Place a wire nut on these wires and fold them into the switch box.
4. Connect the ground wire to the ground screw on the switch.
5. Connect the switched wire (to the light) to one terminal on the switch (either terminal, it doesn’t matter)
6. Connect the tail from the power wires to the other terminal on the switch.

Terminations at the first receptacle:
You are required to use a GFCI receptacle here.
1. Connect all ground wires together and leave an approximate 6 inch tail to connect to the ground screw on the receptacle.
2. Connect the neutral wire from the power in cable (from the switch) to the line side neutral terminal on the receptacle.
3. Connect the hot wire from the power in cable (from the switch) to the line side hot terminal on the receptacle.
4. Connect the neutral wire from the power out cable (to the second receptacle) to the load side neutral terminal on the receptacle.
5. Connect the hot wire from the power out cable (to the second receptacle) to the load side hot terminal on the receptacle.

I’m assuming that because there is only 1 cable at the light and second receptacle, the terminations are straight forward.

Since the shed is not heated, I recommend an incandescent light. These work much better in the cold. You may try a fluorescent light, but they do not like to start when the temperature in below zero; unless you get a specialty (high output with a cold weather ballast) fixture.

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Comments

4 Responses to “Wiring 2 Receptacles, 1 Light Switch and a Light in a Shed”

  1. Gene Windham on April 28th, 2008 7:24 am

    Please show me a diagram of the above wiring. I’m getting ready to do the same thing to my shed.

    THANKS,
    Gene

  2. bbuc on May 21st, 2008 8:41 pm

    Can I also see a wiring diagram for this as I wish to do the same. Also, why is a GFCI required if it’s going be inside the shed and probably not near a water source?

  3. Dan on October 4th, 2008 7:12 pm

    I have a two switches in one box that have 2 wires going to them and one jumper wire that connects to the both switches. One switch controls the outside lifgt and the other the hall way. the one switch has wires coming to it hot and the other does not. I hooked the one black wire that is hot on the one top screw and the other black wire to the bottom and done the same to other switch. I took that jumper wire and connected the one black wire to the first switch that had the hot wire and wired the white wire with all the others with a nut. I took the other end of that wire and took the hot black wire and hook it to the top screw of the other switch and took that white wire and put a nut on all three of those wires. I hooked up all the ground wire from each switch. when I turn the light on for that hallway it turned on my kitchen lights, thats the room next to this room. how do i hook up yhat extra wire/jumper wire up between the two switches. The first switch is the only one that has a hot wire comming to it.

  4. richard on July 4th, 2011 1:17 pm

    i would also like a diagram of wiring 2 recepticles1 light switch and lightand would like to know if i could add another switch and recepticle on same line.need diagrams please.also want to know why gfci needed in shed with no running water in it.
    thank you.
    ps like your site

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