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How to Wire a Recreation Room in Your Basement – Part 5: Terminating the Bathroom Circuit

January 11, 2009

In today’s article we are going to discuss terminating the bathroom circuit and getting everything ready for a rough electrical inspection. For anyone that missed the first four parts of this series, you may read them by clicking on the following links:

Let’s get started terminating the bathroom circuit. I figured we would start at the two 2-gang switch box. All of your cables should be labeled to make it easier to identify what each cable does. Bathroom switch box
The first step is to strip the outer sheath off of the cables and expose all of the wires. Be careful when you strip the cables, however. You want to save the little piece that has the markings on it for all of the load wires and place it back on the wire. This will help with remembering which wire is which and with any troubleshooting that may be required later. Bathroom switch box - cables stripped
Now let’s make up the grounds and attach 2 approximate 6 inch tails to connect to the switches later. Bathroom switch box - grounds
Next connect all of the neutrals together and place a wire nut on them. Bathroom switch box - neutrals
Now connect the power wires together and attach 2 approximate 6 inch tails to connect to the switches later. Bathroom switch box - power
Finally, tuck all of the wires into the box. Try to push the wires as far back into the box as possible to protect them from the sheetrocker’s cutting tools. Bathroom switch box - complete
Now let’s move to the GFCI receptacle box GFCI receptacle box
The first step is to strip the outer sheath off of the cables and expose all of the wires. Be careful when you strip the cables, however. You want to save the little piece that has the markings on it for all of the load wires and place it back on the wire. This will help with remembering which wire is which and with any troubleshooting that may be required later. GFCI receptacle box - cables stripped
Now let’s make up the grounds and attach 2 approximate 6 inch tails to connect to the switches later. GFCI receptacle box - grounds
Finally, tuck all of the wires into the box. Try to push the wires as far back into the box as possible to protect them from the sheetrocker’s cutting tools. GFCI receptacle box - complete
Now let’s move to the ceiling lighting box Bathroom ceiling light box
The first step is to strip the outer sheath off of the cables and expose all of the wires. Be careful when you strip the cables, however. I typically do not mark my wires in the lighting boxes. However, it may be helpful if you choose to. Bathroom ceiling light box - stripped
Now let’s make up the grounds and place a wire nut on them. Bathroom ceiling light box - grounds
Next connect all of the neutrals together and place a wire nut on them. Bathroom ceiling light box - neutrals
Now connect the power wires together and place a wire nut on them. Bathroom ceiling light box - power
Finally, tuck all of the wires into the box. Try to push the wires as far back into the box as possible to protect them from the sheetrocker’s cutting tools. Bathroom ceiling light box - complete

Sorry, but I do not have an exhaust fan to hook up and provide pictures for. Be sure you use a 1/2 inch romex connector to connect the romex to the exhaust fan. The connections are straight forward. Simply connect the ground to ground, the neutral to neutral and the hot to hot.

You only have 1 cable entering the vanity light. Simply strip the sheath off of the cable and tuck the wires into the box. Do the same for the vanity receptacle.

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